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Fulvic Minerals and important key for cellular electric health

Fulvic/ Humic Minerals can be considered most important nutrition discovery of the past 100 years.

Because of its many nutritional components and anti-oxidant and electrolytic power, ounce for ounce Fulvic /Humic Minerals have more instant cellular revitalizing, replenishing, restorative, therapeutic, healing and nourishing characteristics than other nutrients .  Their electrolytic value also has been shown to dramatically increase permeability of bio-membranes, which means that it can sensitize cell membranes for better absorption or assimilation of other nutrients in its presence. This blog article is based on articles recveived from Mineral Logic – www.fulvicmineral.com

SCIENTISTS AGREE; the number ONE cause of all disease and aging is loss of cellular integritydue to inadequate supply of bio-electric energy, nutrients and oxygen!

 The RESULT of this Loss of Electric Potential;

  1. Inability of cells to rid themselves of the wastes of cellular metabolism and mitosis (cell division) at the optimum rate.
  2.  The solidifying of the cell membrane preventing adequate intake of oxygen and nutrients.
  3. Increase in the residence time of toxins in the blood stream and organs from various sources such as bad diet, lack of exercise and environmental pollutants.
  4. Loss of body and brain energy.
  5. Disruption of sleep patterns.
  6. Unhealthy weight gain or weight loss.
  7. Glandular malfunction.
  8. Internal vital organ diseases
  9. Diabetes
  10. Compromised immune response inlcuding cancer and virtually every disease known.

The benefits of vitamins, macro-minerals, enzymes and antioxidant supplements cannot be unlocked by the body’s cells without one key ingredient that today, most people lack.  Fulvic/Humic Minerals!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To effectively return optimum cellular integrity and electrical potential to your body’s cells, trace minerals must contain a minimum of sixty trace minerals and elements.  They must also contain a minimum of 10% oxygen, trace amounts of amino acids, and they must be from a plant-origin and chelated with (or bound to) fulvic and humic acids.  Trace minerals that contain no measurable fulvic or humic acid are not of plant-origin.  Only a few sources in the world exist with readily accessible true fulvic / humic mineral deposits of plant origin… 

Benefits of Bio-Electrically Charged Fulvic/Humic Minerals used regurarly

  • Stimulate metabolism
  • Give positive effect on RNA & DNA
  • Act as a catalyst in respiration
  • Increase metabolism of proteins
  • Increase activity of multiple enzymes
  • Enhances the permeability of cell membranes
  • Enhance cell division and cell elongation
  • Aid chlorophyll synthesis
  • Increase drought tolerance, and prevent wilting
  • Increase crop yields
  •  Assist denitrification by microbes
  • Buffer soil pH
  • Contribute electrochemical balance as a donor or an acceptor
  • Synthesize new minerals
  • Chemically weather inorganic substances
  • Decompose silica to release essential mineral nutrients
  • Detoxify various pollutants (pesticides, herbicides, etc.)
  • Increases Energy
  • Alleviates anemia
  • Chelates body toxins
  • Reduces high blood pressure
  • Potentates vitamin & mineral supplements
  • Magnifies the effect of herbal teas and tinctures
  • Chelates all monovalent and divalent metals
  • Is a powerful natural electrolyte
  • Restores electrochemical balance
  •  Stimulates body enzyme systems
  • Helps rebuild the immune system

Reported external beneficial use in:

  • Treating open wounds
  • Healing burns with minimum pain or scarring
  • Eliminating discoloration due to skin bruises
  • Killing pathogens responsible for athlete’s foot
  • Acting as a wide spectrum anti-microbial and fungicide
  • Treating rashes and skin irritations
  • Helping to heal cuts and abrasions
  • Helping heal insect bites and spider bites
  • Neutralizing poison ivy and poison oak

Unique and Potent Electrolyte
Fulvic and Humic acid contained in our minerals is a powerful, natural electrolyte that can act as an acceptor or as a donor in the creation of electrochemical balance. If it encounters free radicals with unpaired positive electrons it supplies an equal and opposite negative charge to neutralize the bad effects of the free radicals. Likewise, if the free radicals carry a negative charge, the fulvic acid molecule can supply positive unpaired electrons to nullify that charge.  The donor sites give up mineral ions of angstrom size where and when they are needed most by the body and inside every cell.  The receptor sites take on ions that are rejected by the cells and remove them from the system. In other words they detoxify the body while also delivering a powerful trickle charge of bio-electric energy vital for the health and longevity of every living cell.

Cellular Regeneration Attributed to Fulvic / Humic Acid Electrolyte
Living cells are single bipolar mechanisms, meaning they have a positive and negative composition, and work similar to batteries. Cells are made up of a positively charged acidic central core or nucleus, which is surrounded by the negatively charged alkaline cytoplasm. The components are separated by semi-permeable membranes. Each cell is a single structural unit that functions as a member of the total living organism. Once a cell dies, and eventually in the natural scheme of things, comes into contact with the appropriate soil microbes, it will ultimately break down and turn into a humic substance.

Fulvic/Humic acid has been proven to be one of nature’s most perfect and powerful organic polyelectrolytes. Because many of fulvic acid’s constituents where once involved in photosynthesis, the fulvic retains that latent energy potential stored inside its solar charged molecular structure, which can balance cell life on the molecular level, providing regulated positive and negative charges as needed, acting as both a donor or acceptor. Within the complexities of fulvic acids, the individual molecules are similar but not identical. This variation in makeup allows a variety of possible reactions, positive or negative, or in some cases alternating, to assist the balance. Because of its unique polyelectrolyte properties, fulvic acid can influence the formation or transmutation of new species of metal ions! This means fulvic acid can convert existing minerals into new minerals. The power of a fulvic/humic electrolyte has been shown in repeated tests on animal cells (giant amoebae); to be able to restore life in what researchers termed “a beautiful demonstration” and “astonishing result.” When the electrolyte potential was taken away during the test, the cell ruptured and disintegrated into the surrounding fluid causing death. Upon reintroducing a trickle charge of bio-electric energy the cell reconstructed and became active and healthy!

It was also determined from these same studies, that similar results could be expected of the progressive weakness among humans that results from unchecked hemorrhage, overwhelming emotional stress, uncontrolled infections, unbalanced diet, prolonged loss of sleep, and surgical shock. These examples are all accompanied by a steady decrease in electrical potential that can eventually be reduced to zero at death.  These studies show convincingly that that the physical well being of plants, animals, and humans is determined by proper electrical potential. Fulvic acid has proven to be a powerful organic electrolyte, serving to balance cell life. If the individual cell is restored to its normal chemical balance and thereby in turn its electrical potential, we have given life where death and disintegration would normally occur within plant and animal cells. Fulvic acid has the outstanding ability to accomplish this objective in numerous ways.

KEEPING YOUR BODY FLUIDS PURE
The cell is immortal. It is merely the fluid in which it floats which degenerates. Renew this fluid at intervals, give the cells what they require for nutrition and, as far as we know, the pulsation of life may go on forever.”

–Dr. Alexis Carrel, Nobel Prize in Medicine

It is essential that the electrical potential of all cells remain balanced and “charged”. A high quality electrolyte is essential for proper cellular function. An electrolyte is a substance that dissolves in water or other suitable medium that will conduct electrical current. An electrolyte is essential to cells because in molecular processes it permits electrons to be set loose, transferring electrical current, by allowing the flow of ions. Fulvic acid is a polyelectrolyte which means “much electric.” The value of an electrolyte can be shown by an experiment that was done by researchers on a giant amoeba, which is a microscopic single cell animal. Under a microscope the electrolytic potential of the amoeba, which is normally 20 millivolts, was depressed to zero.

The researchers then noticed astonishing changes as the amoeba become dysfunctional, the outer membrane then ruptured in several places, and internal components began to flow out into the surrounding fluid. At that point researchers visually concluded that the form and structure of the amoeba had disintegrated and it was for all purposes dead. Upon increasing the electrolytic charge, the form of the amoeba reconstructed and became active and healthy again. This same test was repeated many times with the same results.

 FULVIC / HUMIC MINERALS electrical potential has been measured in a laboratory showing impressive conductivity of 132,600 uS/cm @ 25 degrees centigrade!! This translates into powerful trickle charges available to cells for maintaining cellular health and longevity!

Vitamin Booster!
In this century common vitamin deficiency diseases have been reduced dramatically due to our awareness of the role of vitamins in nutrition. New breakthroughs are just beginning to emerge in the use of increased dosages for treatment of some ailments. It should be noted however that vitamins cannot complete their function in the cell’s metabolism without the presence of certain minerals. This may explain the fascinating effects of humic and fulvic acids at work in living organisms. Fulvic acid chelated mineral complexes and binds scores of minerals into a bio-available form use by cells as needed. These trace minerals serve as catalysts to vitamins within the cell. Additionally, fulvic acid is on to the most efficient transporters of vitamins into the cell.

The Enzyme Connection
An enzyme is a catalyst that does not enter into a reaction but speeds up or causes a reaction to take place. Enzymes are complex proteins. The burning of glucose in cells for instance, requires the action of several enzymes, each working on the substrate of the previous reaction. Each cell of the body (when properly nourished) is capable of producing the enzymes needed for complete metabolism. Research has shown that fulvic acid improves enzymatic reactions in cells and produces maximum stimulation of enzyme development.

The fulvic acid molecule often contains within its structure coenzymes and important factors that the cells may utilize in the manufacturing and stimulation of enzyme reactions and formation.  Leading scientists, such as Roger J. Williams, recognize that: “the building blocks present in the metabolic machinery of human beings are, in the greatmajority of cases, exactly the same as the building blocks contained in the metabolicmachinery of other organism of extremely different types. “Fulvic acid will in all probability, be found to be one of the key factors of enzyme reactions with all living cells.

Recognized by Science as Nature’s Most Powerful Anti-Oxidant
To gain knowledge of how antioxidants tie up free radicals we must understand their workings, and explode a general misconception. For antioxidant to bind a free radical the antioxidant molecule must have unpaired electrons of equal and opposite charge to that of the unpaired electrons of the free radical. In a sense the free radical scavenger is its self a free radical or it could not mate and neutralize the destructive effects of free radicals.     Fulvic/Humic Minerals contain generous quantities of nature’s most powerful anti-oxidant.

Fulvic Acid Minerals – Nature’s Perfect Delivery System
A water solution can contain much higher mineral concentration when dissolved into fulvic acid than it could otherwise hold. It is most important to realize that fulvic acid is natures own perfect vehicle for transport of minerals to living cells. This is because fulvic acid bonds with minerals and other molecules and transforms them. Since fulvic acids are formed by decomposition of once living matter, fulvic acid contains hidden treasures of the past, in the perfect plant form, in nature’s own recycling process. Mineral, metal, and trace element complexes with fulvic acid become an additional bonus to the miracle of fulvic acid. These fulvic complexes are hundreds of times smaller than living cells, and are amazingly absorbable by them.

It is most important to know that fulvic acid has the unique ability to enhance, potentiates, and increase absorption of many other compounds such as vitamins, herbs, minerals, tinctures, and foods with which it is combined in the stomach.

The Fulvic Library at Mineral Logic (click here)!

The original 38 million years old and very clean Fulvic Minerals from Mineral Logic are sold in Europe by Uno Vita AS.

See the net store; shop.unovita.com for more information.

References:
Yuan, Shenyuan; et al; Application of Fulvic acid and its derivatives in the fields of agriculture and medicine; First Edition: June 1993
Kuhnert et al.; Pharmakologisch-toxikologische Eigenschaften von Huminsausen undihre Wirkungsprofile fur eine veterinarmedizinische Therapie. Deutsche Tierartztliche wochenschrift; 1989; 96:3.
Ghabbour et al; 1994. J. Appl. Phycol., 6:459
Khairy, et al; Acta medica Empirica; 1981; 11:898. Also, De Natura Rerum; 1989; 3:229. Also, De Natura Rerum; 1991; 5:76.
Senesi, N; Miano, TM; Humic substances in the global environment: implications for human health; Elsevier: Amsterdam; 1994.
Klocking, R; Humic substances as potential therapeutics; 1994; in Senesi, N; Miano, T.M; Humic substances in the global environment and implications on human health: proceedings of the 6th international meeting of the International Humic Substances Society, Monopoli, Italy; September 20-25, 1992; Elsevier: Amsterdam.
MacCarthy, P; et al; An introduction to soil humic substances; 1990; in MacCarthy, P; et al; Humic substances in soil and crop sciences: Selected reading: Proceedings of a symposium cosponsored by the International Humic Substances Society, in Chicago, Illinois, December 2, 1985.
Malcolm, R.L; Variations between humic substances isolated from soils, stream waters, and groundwaters as revealed by C-NMR spectroscopy; in MacCarthy, P; et al; Humic substances in soil and crop sciences: Selected readings: proceedings of a symposium cosponsored by the International Humic Substances Society, in Chicago, Illinois, December 2, 1985). Malcolm (1990: 14).
Visser, S.A; Effects of humic substances on higher animals and man; the possible use of humic compounds in medical treatments; 1988; which was presented at the International Humic Substances Society meeting in Sevilla, Spain.
Davies, G; The nucleus, Feb. 1996: Properties and Functions of Humic Acids
Schnitzer, M. (1977). Recent findings of the characterization of humic substances extracted from soils from widely differing climatic zones.
Proceedings of the Symposium on Soil Organic Matter Studies, Braunsweig (117-131).
Aiken, G. R., McKnight, D. M., & VacCarthy, P. 1985). Humic substances of soil, sediment and water, New York: Wildy-Interscience.
Azo, S. & Sakai, I. (1963). Studies on the physiological effects of humic acid. Part 1. Uptake of humic acid by crop plants and its physiological effects. Soil Science and Plant Nutrition, 9(3), 1-91. (Tokyo)
Aiken, G. R., McKnight, D. M., & VacCarthy, P. 1985). Humic substances of soil, sediment and water,New York: Wildy-Interscience.
Christman, R.F., & Gjessing, E. T. (1983). Aquatic and terrestrial humic materials. The Butterworth Grove, Kent, England: Ann Arbor Science. Also: Prakash, A. (1971).
Terrigenous organic matter and coastal phytoplankton fertility. In J.D. Costlow (Ed.), Fertility of the sea, 2, 351-368. (Proceedings of an International Symposium on Fertility of the Sea, Sao Paulo, Brazil, London, and New York: Gordon and Breach Science)
Shnitzer, M., & Dodama, H. (1977). Reactions of minerals with soil humic substances. In J. B. Dixon & S. B. Weed (Eds.), Minerals in soil environments (Chap. 21)). Madison, WI: Soil Science Society of America.
Senesi, N. (1990) Analytica Chimica Acta, 232, 51-75. Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Elsevier.
Prakash, A. (1971). Fertility of the Sea, 2, 351-368.
Rashid, M.A. (1985). Geochemistry of Marine Humic Substances. New York: Springer-Verlag.
Buffle, J. (1988). Complexation Reactions in Aquatic Systems: An Analytical Approach. Chichester: Horwood.
Christman, R.F., & Gjessing, E. T. (1983). Aquatic and Terrestrial Humic Materials. The Butterworth Grove, Kent, England: Ann Arbor Science.
California Fertilizer Association. (1985). Western Fertilizer Handbook. Danville, Il: Interstate.
Greenland, D. J.. (1965). Soils and Fertilizers. 35(5), 415-532.
Wilkins, M.D. (Ed.). (1984). Advanced Plant Physiology. Marshfield, MA: Pitman.Kononova, M. M. (1966). Soil Organic Matter. Elmsford, NY: Pergamon.Power of an electorlyte – Crile, G. (1926). A bipolar theory of living porcesses. New York: McMillan.
Decrease in electrical potential– Crile, G. (1926). A bipolar theory of living porcesses. New York:McMillan
Powerful electrolyte – Jackson, William R. (1993). Humic, Fulvic and Microbial Balance: Organic Soil
Conditioning, 329. Evergeen, Colorado: JacksonResearchCenter.
New Electronic Encyclopedia. (1991). Photosynthesis. Grolier Electronic Publishing.
Donor and acceptor – Jackson, William R. (1993). Humic, Fulvic and Microbial Balance: Organic Soil
Conditioning. Evergreen, Colorado: JacksonResearchCenter.
Donor and receptor – Rashid, M.A. (1985). Geochemistry of marine humic substances. New York: Springer-Verlag.
Donor, receptor– Sposito, G., Holtzclaw, K.M., LeVesque, C.S., & Johnston, C.T.(1982). Trace metal chemistry in arid-zone field soils amended with sewage sludge. II. Comparative study of the fulvic acidfraction. Soil Science Society America Journal, 46. 265-270.
Mineral complexes in fulvic may serve as electrodes – Rashid, M.A. (1985). Geochemistry of marine humic substances. New York: Springer-Verlag.
Free radical – Senesi, N. (1990) Analytica Chmica Acta, 232, 51-75. Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Elsevier.
Free radical – Senesi, N., Chen, Y., & Schnitzer, M. (1977b). The role of humic acids in extracellular electron transport and chemical determination of pH in natural waters. Soil Biology and Biochemitstry, 9, 397-403.
Oxidation reduction – Senesi, N., Chen, Y., & Schnitzer, M. (1977b). The role of humic acids in extracellular electron transport and chemical determination of pH in natural wates. Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 9, 397-403.
Dissolves metals and minerals – Ong, H.L., Swanson, V.D., & Bisque, R.E. (1970) Natural organic acids as agents of chemical weathering (130-170). U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 700 c. Washngton, DC: U.S. Geological Survey.
Enhance and transport nutrients – Christman, R.F., & Gjessing, E.T. (1983). Aquatic and terrestrial humic materials. The Butterworth Grove, Kent, England: Ann Arbor Science.
Prakash, A. (1971). Terrigenous organic matter and coastal phytoplankton fertility. In J.D. Costlow (Ed), Fertility of the sea, 2, 351-368. (Proceedings of an International Symposium on Fertilty of the Sea,Sao Paulo, Brazil, London, and New York: Gordon and Breach Science)
Enhance and transport nutrients – Prakish, A. (1971). Fertility of the Sea, 2, 351-368.
Williams, S. T. (1963). Are antibiotics produced in soil? Pedobiologia, 23, 427-435.
Stimulate growth– Konovona, M.M. (1966). Soil organic matter. Elmsford, NY: Pergamon.
All known vitamins in soil – Konovova, M. M. (1966). Soil organic matter. Elmsford, NY: Pergamon.
Many times its weight– Deb, B. C. (1949). The movement and precipitation of iron oxides in podzol soils. Journal of Soil Science, 1, 112-122.
Catalyzes enzyme reactions – Khristeva, L. A., Luk’Yanonko, M.V. (1962). Role of physiologically active substances in soil-humic acids, bitumens and vitamins B, C, P-P A and D in the life of plants and their replenishment. Soviet Soil Science, 10, 1137-1141.
Fulvic and enzymes – Pardue, H.L, Townshend, A., Clere, J.T., VanderLinden (Eds.), (1990, May 1).
Analytica chimica Acta, Special Issue, Humic and Fulvic compounds, 232 (1), 1-235.  (Amsterdam, Netherlands: Elsevier Science Publishers)
Increase assimilation- Buffle
Low molecular weight, Aiken, G.R., McKnight, D.M., & VacCarthy, P.1985). Humic substances of soil, sediment and water, New York: Wiley-Interscience
Sensitize cell membranes– Rashid, M.A. (1985). Geochemistry of Marine Humic Substances. New York: Spriner-Verlag.
Stimulte metabolism-Rashid, M.A. (1985). Geochemistry of Marine Humic Substances. New York: Springer-Verlag.
Genetic and growth-Jackson, William R. (1993). Humic, Fulvic and Microbial Balance: Organic Soil Conditioning, 538. Evergreen, Colorado: JacksonResearchCenter.
Oxygen is absorbed – Kononova, M.M. (1966). Soil organic matter. Elmsford, NY: Pergamon.
Rapid transport to shoots- Kononova, M.M. (1966). Soil organic matter. Elmsford, NY: Pergamon
Immune system – Syltic, P.W. (1985). Effects of very small amounts of highly active biological substances on plant growth. Biological Agriculture and
orticulture, 2, 245-269; and, Research reports and studies, Appropriate Technology Ltd. Dallas, TX: Murray Sinks II of ATL (Publisher).
Modify damage by toxic compounds – Christman, R.F., & Gjessing, E.T. (1983). Aquatic and terrestrial
humic materials. The Butterworth Grove, Kent, England: Ann Arbor Science. Also: Prakash, A. (1971).
Terrigenous organic matter and coastal phytoplankton fertility. In J.D. Costlow (Ed.), Fertility of the sea, 2, 351-368. (Proceedings of an International Symposium on Fertility of the Sea, Sao Paulo, Brazil,London, and New York: Gordon and Breach Science)
Paraquat – Fisher, A.M., Winterle, J.S., & Mill, T. (1967). Primary photochemical processes in photolysis mediated by humic substances. In R.G. Zika & W. J. Cooper (Eds).
Photochemistry of environmental aquatic system (141-156). (ACS Sympoium Series 327). WashingtonDC: American Chemical Society.
Pesticides – Aiken, G.R., McKnight, D.M., & MacCarthy, P. (1985). Humic substances os oil, sediment and water. New York: Wiley-Interscience.
Radioactive properties – Szalay, A. (1958). The signifiicance of humus in the geochemical enrichment of uranium. Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy, 2, 12-186 (London: Pergamon)
Dissolves and weathers silica– Huang, W.H., & Deller, W.D. (1970). Dissolution of rock-forming silicate minerals in organic acids; simulated first-stage weathering of fresh mineral surfaces. American Mineralogical Journal, 55, 2076-2094.
Dissolves silica– Kodama, H., Schnitzer, M., & Jaakkimainen, M. (1983). Chlorite and biotite weathering by fulvic acid solutions in closed and open systems. Canadian Journal of Soil Science, 63, 619-629.
Transmutate or synthesis of new minerals – Shnitzer, M., Dodama. H. (1977). Reactions of minerals with soil humic substances. In J.B. Dixon & S.B. Weed (Eds.), Minerals in soil environments (Chap.21)). Madison, WI: Soil Science Society of America.
The Fulvic Acid, Vegetal Silica Miracle” later in this report, and further documentation of Kervran, Louis C., Biological Transmutations.
Cell clongation – Poapst, P.A., & Schnitzer, M. (1971). Fulvic acid and adventitious root formation.
Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 3, 215-219.
Enhance permeability of cell membranes – Christman, R.F., & Gjessing, E.T. (1983). Aquatic and terrestrial humic materials. The Butterworth Grove, Kent, England: Ann Arbor Science. Also: Prakash, (1971).
Terrigenous organic matter and coastal phytoplankton fertility. In J.D. Costlow (Ed.), Fertility of the sea, 2, 351-368. (Proceedings of an International Symposium on Fertility of the Sea, Sao Paulo,Brazil, London, and New York: Gordon and Breach Science ) low molecular weight, Aiken, G.R., McKnight, D.M., & VacCarthy, P. 1985). Humic substances of soil, sediment and water, New York: Wiley – Interscience.
Sensitizing agent – Prakash, A. (1971). Terrigenous organic matter and coastal phytoplankton fertility.
In J.D. Costlow (Ed.), Fertility of the sea, 2, 351-368. (Proceedings of an International Symposium on Fertility of the Sea, Sao Paulo, Brazil, London, and New York: Gordon and Breach Science)
Increase metabolism of proteins – Christman, R.F., & Gjessing, E.T. (1983). Aquatic and terrestrial humic materials. The Butterworth Grove, Kent, England: Ann Arbor Science. Also: Prakash, A. (1971). Terrigenous organic matter and coastal phytoplankton fertility. In J.D. Costlow (Ed.), Fertility of the sea, 2, 351-368. (Proceedings of an International Symposium on Fertility of the Sea, Sao Paulo, Brazil, London, and New York: Gordon and Breach Science)
Proteins, DNA, RNA – Khristeva, L.A., Soloche, K.I., Dynkina, R.L., Kovalenko, V.E., & Gorobaya, A.I. (1967). Influence of physiologically active substances of soil humus and fertilizers on nucleic acid metabolism, plant growth and subsequent quality of the seeds. Humus et Planta, 4, 272-276. Proteins, DNA, RNA – Jackson, William R. (1993). Humic, Fulvic and Microbial Balance: Organic Soil Conditioning, 569-570. Evergreen, Colorado: JacksonResearchCenter. Synthesis of RNA and DNA – Khristeva, L.A. (1968). About the nature of physiologically active substances of the soil humus and of organic fertilizers and their agricultural importance. In F.V. Hernando (Ed,), Pontifica academec scientarium citta del vaticano (701-721). New York: John Wiley.
Catalyst to vitamins within the cell – Williams, Dr. Roger J. (1977). The Wonderful World Within You. Bio-Communications Press. Wichita, Kansas.
Acidity of fulvic acid – Schnitzer, M. (1977). Recent findings of the characterization of humic substances extracted fromsoils from widely differing climatic zones. Proceedings of the Symposium on Soil Organic Matter Studies, Braunsweig (117-131). Environment with adeequate oxygen – Schnitzer, M. (1977). Recent findings of the characterization of humic substances extracted from soils from widely differing climatic zones. Proceedings of the Symposium on Soil Organic Matter Studies, Braunsweig (117-131).
Absorption by cells – Azo, S. & Sakai, I (1963). Studies on the physiological effects of humic acid. Part 1. Uptake of humic acid by crop plants and its physiological effects. Soil Science and Plant Nutrition, 9(3), 1-91. (Tokyo)
Translocation of trace elements to leaf tissues – Aiken, G.R., McKnight, D.M., & VacCarthy,P. 1985).
Humic substances of soil, sediment and water, New York: Wiley-Interscience.
Important for the health of plants – Christman, R.F., & Gjessing, E.T. (1983). Aquatic and terrestrial humic materials. The Butterworth Grove, Kent, England: Ann Arbor Science. Also: Prakash, A. (1971).
Impossible to define- Vaughan, D., & Malcolm, R.E. (1985b). Soil organic matter and biological activity. Plant and soil Science, 16, 1-443. (Dordrecht, Netherlands: Martinus Nijhoff/Dr.W.Junk)
Unable to be synthesized – not clearly defined. Murray, K., & Linder, P.W. (1983). Fulvic acids: Structure and metal binding. I. A random molecular model. Journal of Soil Science, 34, 511-523.
Unable to define – Senesi, N., Chen, Y., & Schnitzer, M. (1977b). the role of humic acids in extracellular electron transport and chemical determination of pH in natural waters. Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 9, 397 analytical approach. Chichester: Horwood.
Complex more metal – Rashid, M.A. (1971). Role of humic acids of marine origin and their different molecular weight fractions in complexing Di-and Triavalent metals. Soil Science, 111, 298-306.
Dissolves more metal – Hoffman, M.R., Yost, E.C., Eisenreich, S.J., & Mairer, W.J. (1981).
Characterization of soluble and colloidal phase metal complexes in river water ultrafiltration. A mass balance approach. Environmental Science Technology, 15, 655.
Mineral levels in excess of their assumed dissolution ability – Kodama, H., Schnitzer, M., & Jaakkimainen, M. (1983). Chlorite and biotite weathering by fulvic acid solutions in closed and open systems. Canadian Journal of Soil Science, 63, 619-629.
Penetration of fulvic into plant cells – Prat, S., Smidova, M., & Cincerova, A.L. (1961). Penetration and effect of humus substances (fractions) on plant cells. International Congress of Biochemistry, 5th (Abstract Commun. 329). (Moscow) free radical” – Senesi, N. (1990) Analytica Chimica Acta, 232, 51-75. Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Elsevier.
Vital electrolytes – Backer, W.E. (1973) Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 37, 269-281.
Make water wetter – Rashid, M.A. (1985). Geochemistry of Marine Humic Substances. New York: Springer-Verlag.
Catalyze enzyme reactions – Rashid, M.A. (1985). Geochemistry of Marine Humic Substances. New York: Springer-Verlag.
Chelatemajor and trace elements – Rashid, M.A. (1971). Soil Science, 111, 298-306.
Capacity for electrochemical balance – Senesi, N. (1990) Analytica Chimica Acta, 232, 51-75. Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Elsevier.
Essential to the process – Christman, R.F., & Gjessing, E.T. (1983). Aquatic and Terrestrial Humic Materials. The Butterworth Grove, Kent, England: Ann Arbor Science.
Essential to healthy plants – California Fertilizer Association. (1985). Western Fertilizer Handbook. Danville, II: Interstate.
Auxin type reactions – Wilkins, M.D. (Ed.). (1984). Advanced Plant Physiology. Marshfield, MA: Pitman.
Plant circulatory systems – Rashid, M.A. (1985). Geochemistry of Marine Humic Substances. New York: Springer – Verlag.
Transpiration systems – Kononova, M.M. (1966). Soil Organic Matter. Elmsford, NY: Pergamon.
Fibrous root growth – Kononova, M.M. (1966).Soil Organic Matter. Elmsford, NY: Pergamon.
Insect infestation – Salk, P.L., & Parker, L.W. (1986). A New Agricultural Biotechnology: Potential Applications in Arid and Semi-Arid Zones. American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Government of LaRioja, Argentina.
Increase enzyme activity – Malcolm, R.D., & Vaughan, D. (1979). Comparative effects of soil organic matter fractions on phosphatase activities in wheat roots. Plant and Soil, 51, 117-126. Also: Mato, M.C., Gonzales-Alonso, L.M., & Mendez, J. (1972). Inhibition of enzymatic indoleacetic acid oxidation by fulvic acids. Soil Biology and Biochmistry, 4, 475-478.
Prevents wilting – Rashid, M.A. (1985). Geochemistry of marine humic substances. New York:Springer-Verlag.
Chemical weathering, Simonson, R.W. (1959). Outline of a generalized theory of soil genesis. Soil Science Society America Proceedings, 23, 152-156.
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